All posts tagged: feminist art

"Half-A-Room" literally.

One Woman Show + Analogue

I never knew much about Yoko Ono aside from the fact that my mother didn’t like her music. However, a few years ago, I interned at the A.I.R. Gallery. A.I.R. was the first feminist art gallery in North America and the artists that are part of A.I.R. were, and are, amazing, eye-opening, and perpetually inventive. I remember hearing about Yoko Ono in the context of a few of our events, so knowing that she was involved in feminist art piqued my interest about her, though I still never gave her the attention she deserved.

Natural Beauty

I love art/videos/messages like this. This one happens to be really similar to the work of an artist I met recently, Jessica Lagunas. In “Para besarte mejor,” “Para acariciarte mejor,” and “Para verte mejor,” Lagunas puts on lipstick, nailpolish, and mascara respectively for an hour. The end result is an horrific-looking satire of beauty standards. She also has some other really cool work, especially relating to the status of women in Guatemala, that is totally worth checking out.

Billowing Beauty

From On-Verge: Next to a GNC, a Duane Reade, and a busy New York hotel, a colorful wonderland inhales and exhales in a storefront window Mid-town.  The “wonderland” is Anne Ferrer’s latest installation, Billowing Beauty, on view at The LAB, a midtown art gallery that specializes in “outrospectives.” The Paris-based artist works in fabric and air, so to speak. Using brightly colored textiles, she crafts oddly shaped creatures or objects that are then inflated by fans, creating a living choreography in her sculpture-esque work. You can read the whole story here.

Art x Women and the Affordable Art Fair

New post up at On-Verge about the Art x Women series at the Affordable Art Fair this year: Nine galleries  collaborated to host the first-ever section dedicated to work by women artists at an art fair. Though the feminist art movement rose to prominence during the cultural revolution of the 1970s, many hurdles continue to exist in publicizing and popularizing contemporary feminist art. More recently, through the effort of feminist artists, curators, and organizations, women-produced art has seen a resurgence with large-scale exhibits, such as WACK and ELLE@centrepompidou. Upon entering AAF, visitors who exited from the middle elevator were greeted by the pop art paintings of two naked women by artist David Bromley. In the midst of a crowded fair like this, one couldn’t help but think that the ironic positioning of these pieces was rather apropos, further proof of the necessity of a specifically feminist space in the large event hall. See the full article here.

But that’s a different story… at A.I.R. Gallery

My review of A.I.R. Gallery’s But that is another story… is up on On-Verge, CUE Foundation’s new alternative art criticism blog. The show was great and I especially loved Jeanette May’s bachelor series. (Some of the “bachelors” were at the opening reception, as well, which is always fun and surreal.) Check out the full article at On-Verge. For more information about the show, hit up A.I.R. Gallery.